Tax & ATO News Australia

Ham and Tax Practitioners Board (Taxation) [2017] AATA 1642

An appeal has been lodged by the applicant tax agent against the decision of Ham and Tax Practitioners Board, whereby the AAT affirmed the decision of the Tax Practitioners Board (TPB) to reject Mr Ham’s application for renewal of registration, on the basis he is not a ‘fit and proper person’ within the meaning of the Tax Agent Services Act 2009 (TAS Act). 

The TPB’s refusal to renew Mr Ham’s registration arose following the decision of Themis Holdings Pty Ltd v Canehire Pty Ltd & Anor [2014] QSC and the subsequent appeal. In summary, Philippides J found Mr Ham, as the sole director of Canhire Pty Ltd, knowingly breached his fiduciary duties and acted dishonestly in paying away proceeds of a sale, which lawfully belonged to beneficiaries of a trust.

Accordingly, on the basis of Mr Ham’s conduct following the Supreme Court decision, the TPD rejected Mr Ham’s application to renewal on the grounds he was not a ‘fit and proper person’.

Subsequently, Mr Ham sought to have the TPD’s decision reviewed by the AAT.

In determining whether Mr Ham satisfied the definition of a ‘fit and proper person’ for the purposes of the TAS Act, the Tribunal held that it was entitled to rely on the findings of the Philippides J in the Supreme Court judgement as evidence for its own findings.

The Tribunal in concluding it was entitled to rely on the findings of the Supreme Court referred to s33(1)(c) of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975 (AAT Act), which provides ‘the Tribunal may inform itself on any matter in such a manner as it thinks it appropriate’.

Accordingly, in conjunction with the Tribunal’s objectives in section 2A of the AAT Act, and present case it concluded that:

  • the most expeditors and efficient means by which the Tribunal can inform itself is by reference to the Supreme Court findings;
  • it would be too costly and time consuming to effectively conduct a re-hearing; and
  • the potential unfairness to Mr Ham was reduced as he was represented in both proceedings and had the opportunity to lead further evidence.


With regard to the question of whether Mr Ham is a fit and proper person, the Tribunal considered Mr Ham’s conduct ‘inconsistent, not only with the qualities of strong moral principle, uprightness and honestly, but also with the atmosphere of mutual trust, that underpins a tax agent’s relationship with his or her clients, the ATO and the Tax Practitioners Board’.

The Tribunal further recognised that Mr Ham failed to take steps to redress his actions, despite having ample opportunity to do so.

Mr Ham sought to argue that he is a ‘fit and proper person’ as he has expressed insight and contrition. However, the Tribunal was not persuaded for the following reasons:

  • Mr Ham’s contrition was late, his letter to the Tax Practitioners Board contained no expression of contrition or remorse;
  • It was inconsistent for Mr Ham to state he “unreservedly” accepts the Supreme Court’s decision, yet he continues to maintain his own version of event;
  • It was inconsistent for Mr Ham to realise the unethical nature of his conduct yet contest it at future disciplinary proceedings; and
  • Mr Ham’s proposed systems to prevent future misconduct demonstrated an oversimplified of the conduct found by the Supreme Court

At the hearing, Mr Ham indicated he would be prepared to abide by two conditions should his registration be renewed:

  • furnish a written report to the TPB at the end of each month for 12 months identifying any transactions he or his associated entities entered into; and
  • undertaking a Professional Development Business Ethics Training Course.

The Tribunal in response to the restrictions proposed by Mr Ham, found that ‘the imposition of conditions is not intended to be an alternative avenue for an applicant who fails to satisfy the standard of fitness and proprietary’.

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 16 November 17

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Author: David Hughes

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