Tax & ATO News Australia

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Ham and Tax Practitioners Board (Taxation) [2017] AATA 1642

An appeal has been lodged by the applicant tax agent against the decision of Ham and Tax Practitioners Board, whereby the AAT affirmed the decision of the Tax Practitioners Board (TPB) to reject Mr Ham’s application for renewal of registration, on the basis he is not a ‘fit and proper person’ within the meaning of the Tax Agent Services Act 2009 (TAS Act). 

The TPB’s refusal to renew Mr Ham’s registration arose following the decision of Themis Holdings Pty Ltd v Canehire Pty Ltd & Anor [2014] QSC and the subsequent appeal. In summary, Philippides J found Mr Ham, as the sole director of Canhire Pty Ltd, knowingly breached his fiduciary duties and acted dishonestly in paying away proceeds of a sale, which lawfully belonged to beneficiaries of a trust.

Accordingly, on the basis of Mr Ham’s conduct following the Supreme Court decision, the TPD rejected Mr Ham’s application to renewal on the grounds he was not a ‘fit and proper person’.

Subsequently, Mr Ham sought to have the TPD’s decision reviewed by the AAT.

In determining whether Mr Ham satisfied the definition of a ‘fit and proper person’ for the purposes of the TAS Act, the Tribunal held that it was entitled to rely on the findings of the Philippides J in the Supreme Court judgement as evidence for its own findings.

The Tribunal in concluding it was entitled to rely on the findings of the Supreme Court referred to s33(1)(c) of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975 (AAT Act), which provides ‘the Tribunal may inform itself on any matter in such a manner as it thinks it appropriate’.

Accordingly, in conjunction with the Tribunal’s objectives in section 2A of the AAT Act, and present case it concluded that:

  • the most expeditors and efficient means by which the Tribunal can inform itself is by reference to the Supreme Court findings;
  • it would be too costly and time consuming to effectively conduct a re-hearing; and
  • the potential unfairness to Mr Ham was reduced as he was represented in both proceedings and had the opportunity to lead further evidence.


With regard to the question of whether Mr Ham is a fit and proper person, the Tribunal considered Mr Ham’s conduct ‘inconsistent, not only with the qualities of strong moral principle, uprightness and honestly, but also with the atmosphere of mutual trust, that underpins a tax agent’s relationship with his or her clients, the ATO and the Tax Practitioners Board’.

The Tribunal further recognised that Mr Ham failed to take steps to redress his actions, despite having ample opportunity to do so.

Mr Ham sought to argue that he is a ‘fit and proper person’ as he has expressed insight and contrition. However, the Tribunal was not persuaded for the following reasons:

  • Mr Ham’s contrition was late, his letter to the Tax Practitioners Board contained no expression of contrition or remorse;
  • It was inconsistent for Mr Ham to state he “unreservedly” accepts the Supreme Court’s decision, yet he continues to maintain his own version of event;
  • It was inconsistent for Mr Ham to realise the unethical nature of his conduct yet contest it at future disciplinary proceedings; and
  • Mr Ham’s proposed systems to prevent future misconduct demonstrated an oversimplified of the conduct found by the Supreme Court

At the hearing, Mr Ham indicated he would be prepared to abide by two conditions should his registration be renewed:

  • furnish a written report to the TPB at the end of each month for 12 months identifying any transactions he or his associated entities entered into; and
  • undertaking a Professional Development Business Ethics Training Course.

The Tribunal in response to the restrictions proposed by Mr Ham, found that ‘the imposition of conditions is not intended to be an alternative avenue for an applicant who fails to satisfy the standard of fitness and proprietary’.

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 16 November 17

Shord v Commissioner of Taxation

 The case is reasonably unremarkable for any legal or factual analysis, but it does provide a good insight into the attitude of the ATO towards acting as a uncompromising litigant, which makes the most of every possible procedural point, as opposed to a model litigant as they are required.

Justice Logan from Qld made some fantastic comments (with respect);

 

The standard of fair play expected of the Crown and its officers in litigation is a standard in keeping both with the avoidance of behaviours that, in an extreme form, led to the civil war and with the later constitutional settlement. Once this heritage is understood, the requirement for its observance is, or should be, as Griffith CJ stated, “elementary”.

 

I note that Robert Gottleibsen also discussed this case and raised these comments in yesterday’s Australian.

 

Shord v Commissioner of Taxation [2017] FCAFC 167


Between 2006 and 2011, Mr Shord worked on various overseas assignments as a supervisor for foreign companies in the oil and gas industry. He did not lodge tax returns for that period, believing he was a non-resident. The Commissioner believed otherwise and issued amended assessments including all Mr Shord’s foreign income. The Commissioner disallowed Mr Shord’s objection.

The Tribunal found in favour of the Commissioner. The Tribunal found Mr Shord was a resident and, in particular, that his income was not exempt pursuant to s 23AG of the ITAA36. This provision exempts income of residents engaged in foreign services for a continuous period of not less than 91 days.

At the onset of the hearing, counsel for the Commissioner withdrew a contention that Mr Shord’s circumstances failed to meet the legislation’s definition of ‘foreign services’. The Tribunal nonetheless found that Mr Shord did not meet this definition. Fletcher v FCT is authority that a taxpayer is denied procedural fairness when a Tribunal makes a decision on the basis not argued by any party.

Procedural fairness was not raised on appeal to the Federal Court. Instead, the first two questions of law related to the proper application of s 23AG. These hinged on the third question which was whether the Tribunal had jurisdiction to decide whether Mr Shord was engaged in ‘foreign services’. The fourth question was whether Mr Shord was entitled to offsets for foreign taxes paid. The primary judge found against Mr Shord on the third and fourth question and did not therefore consider the first two.

On appeal to the Full Federal Court, procedural fairness was finally raised by Mr Shord as the first ground in an amended notice of appeal. The Commissioner initially objected to the amendment but eventually conceded the ground to Mr Shord. The Full Court thus remitted the matter to the Federal Court to decide the two questions about s 23AG. Unlike the majority, Justice Logan reprimanded the Commissioner, as a representative of the Commonwealth, for its failure to act as a model litigant and raise the crucial issue earlier.

The second ground related to Mr Shord’s entitlement to tax offsets. The Full Court found that Mr Shord did not produce any evidence as to what, when and how much foreign tax he paid, and that neither the Tribunal nor the Commissioner had an obligation to help him adduce evidence to the contrary.
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 01 November 17

A great result for Crown Insurance Services Limited

On Friday 2 November 2012, the Full Federal Court delivered a judgment in favour of our client, Crown Insurance Services Limited and found for our client in a 2:1 decision.

 

In a rather technical decision, the Full Federal Court found that the ATO’s appeal was incompetent – that is, that the ATO should not have attempted to appeal the factual findings of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal which found, as a matter of fact, that the source of our client’s income was not in Australia.
 
Lander and Foster JJ dismissed the Commissioner's appeal, deciding the appeal was incompetent as the Commissioner did not raise a question of law for s44(1) purposes.  Their Honours analysed the authorities on this issue in great detail but did not address the substantive question once they concluded the appeal should be dismissed for want of jurisdiction.
 
Jessup J decided there was a question of law, as the facts found by the Tribunal must necessarily lead to the conclusion that Crown Insurance indirectly derived its income from Australian sources.  His Honour placed great weight on the adverb "indirectly" to distinguish this case from the authorities
 
This is a great result for this client who has been fighting with the ATO for over ten years.
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 05 November 12

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Tax & ATO News Australia

Author: David Hughes

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