Tax & ATO News Australia

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Get your affairs in order before you leave Australia

Are you thinking about leaving Australia to take up a new job? Do you realise that you might be taxed in Australia on the income which you earn overseas? Seeking professional advice from a tax lawyer is imperative as they can provide you with the advice which you need to get your affairs in order so that you do not get surprised by an alarming tax bill.

 

If you are an Australian resident, you are taxed on income that you earn overseas. For example, if you accept a job in Dubai, you will be taxed in Australia on the income which you earn there. On the other hand, if you are a non-resident, you are only taxed on income which is sourced in Australia.
 
The residency tests used by the ATO to determine your residency status for tax purposes are not the same as those used by other Australian agencies, such as the Department of Immigration.

The main test that the ATO uses is the “resides test”. Basically, the ATO will look at whether you reside in Australia according to the ordinary meaning of “reside”.

If you do not satisfy this test, then the ATO may also look at any of the following tests:

• Have you been in Australia for more than 183 days in any year? (183 day test);
• Is your domicile in Australia? If it is, have you established a permanent place of abode outside of Australia (Domicile test); and
• Are you a current Commonwealth government employee? (Superannuation test).

The most contentious of these tests is the domicile test. Two recent AAT decisions found in favour of the ATO because although the taxpayers did not reside in Australia, the taxpayers were considered Australian residents for tax purposes because they failed to establish permanent places of abode outside Australia. In both cases, the taxpayers accepted employment overseas - one as a marine engineer in Dubai, the other as an operations technician in southern Oman. As the taxpayers were required to travel as part of their employment, both taxpayers lived in shared accommodation, but only spent a limited amount of time there. On this basis, the AAT held that the taxpayers had failed to establish permanent places of abode outside Australia.  In one case, the AAT described the taxpayer as a “citizen of the world”.

These cases clearly demonstrate that you need to carefully organise your affairs before you leave Australia.
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 05 June 13

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Tax & ATO News Australia

Author: David Hughes

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