Tax & ATO News Australia

Searching for posts in the month of: January 2018

WLQC and Commissioner of Taxation [2018] AATA 14

 In WLQC and Commissioner of Taxation Deputy President McCabe examines an application for review brought by a series of Applicants in relation to a number of assessments raised by the Commissioner for a nil amount follow the Commissioner’s refusal to recognise the Applicants as a consolidated group.
 

The Applicants sought to apply for review by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (‘AAT’) of a series of objection decision made to uphold assessments of nil for the 2004, 2005 and subsequent financial years as the Commissioner refused to treat the Applicants as a consolidated group.
 

Deputy President McCabe examined whether the nil assessments issued in 2004, 2005 and subsequent years provided the Applicants with a right of review pursuant to Part IVC of the Taxation Administration Act 1953.

2004 nil assessments:

With respect to the nil assessments in the 2004 financial year, section 175A of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 (‘ITAA36’) at the relevant time provided that:


“A taxpayer who is dissatisfied with an assessment made in relation to the taxpayer may object against it in the manner set out in Part IVC of the Taxation Administration Act 1953”

 

Further, section 6 of the ITAA36 at the relevant time defined assessment as:


(a) the ascertainment of:
      i. the amount of taxable income

 

The Commissioner contended that the language of these provisions make it tolerably clear that references to specific amounts of taxable income and a determination of the amount the taxpayer was liable to pay were essential features of an assessment at that relevant time.
 

In support of this position the Commissioner relied upon Batagol v Commissioner of Taxation [1963] HCA 51, which concluded an assessment within the means of the ITAA36 must ascertain an actual amount of tax being due and payable.
 

Conversely, the Applicants relied upon the Full Federal Court’s finding in Commissioner of Taxation v Ryan (1998) 82 FCR 345 that a nil assessment can be made under the ITAA36. However, the decision was overturned by the High Court on appeal on another point.
 

Ultimately, Deputy President McCabe found he was inclined to accept he was bound by the authorities, thus accepted that the nil assessments issued for the 2004 financial year were not valid, and that there is no right of review with respect to those decisions under Part IVC.

 

2005 and subsequent nil assessments:

 

Deputy President McCabe considered the assessments issued with respect to the 2005 and subsequent financial years separately, as the Tax Laws Amendment (Improvements to Self-Assessment) Act (No. 2) 2005 amended sections 6 and 175A of the ITAA36. Following the amendments sub-section 175A(2) was included, which reads:

 

(2) A taxpayer cannot object under sub-section 175A(1) against an assessment ascertaining that
     (a) the taxpayer has no taxable income; or
     (b) the taxpayer has an amount of taxable income and no tax is payable

Unless the taxpayer is seeking an increase in the taxpayer’s liability

 

The Applicants were unable to confirm whether any particular Applicant with a nil assessment was seeking an increase in liability as it would require further analysis of other companies in the corporate group.
 

On this basis, Deputy President McCabe found that section 175A(2) of the ITAA36 could not be satisfied by the Applicants’ merely foreshadowing the possibility of an increase.


Jurisdiction:


With respect to jurisdiction the Applicants argued that the Tribunal should not focus on whether the assessments were invalid, it should concern itself instead with whether the assessments were excessive.
 

In rejecting this argument the Deputy President McCabe found that:
 

“if there is no assessment – and I am constrained to accept there is no assessment in the 2004 year of income where the taxpayers have received a nil assessment – or if the legislation specifically limits the right of review as it has done in s175A(2), the Tribunal has no jurisdiction to review what has been decided”.

 

Co-authored with Ben Caratti
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 29 January 18

NZBG and Commissioner of Taxation (Taxation) [2017] AATA 2784

 The applicant, who currently lives in New Zealand, sought a review of the Commissioner’s refusal to a request for the release of a tax debt. The applicant tendered some written materials and made submissions by telephone at the hearing. The issues in review were whether the tax debt of $92,671.44 and general interest charge of $338,184.38 ought be released, in whole or in part, under s 340-10 of Schedule 1 to the Tax Administration Act 1953 (Cth).

 

The tribunal found that the applicant discharged his onus of proof. The tribunal was not satisfied that the applicant disclosed all of his assets and liabilities, asserting he had no assets other than monies in the bank, for which he failed to put current evidence. The tribunal was neither satisfied that the applicant had no other income besides his New Zealand pension. Statements by New Zealand residents that the applicant filed in relation to the Commissioner’s assertions of other possible assets and income sources were unable to be tested because those persons did not attend the hearing. For those reasons, the tribunal affirmed the Commissioner’s decision.
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 25 January 18

Tyl and Commissioner of Taxation (Taxation) [2017] AATA 2850

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal affirmed the Commissioner’s objection decision in relation to the taxpayer, Mr Damien Tyl. Mr Tyl was working as a truck driver in the 2012 and 2013 financial years when he claimed deduction for travel expenses, work-related expenses and car expenses. He was audited for those expenses resulting in the disallowance of the car expenses and reduction of all other deductions to nil. Mr Tyl objected to the results of the audit. In the objection decision, the Commissioner partly allowed deductions for all of the expenses. The administrative penalty was also reduced but not entirely remitted. Mr Tyl sought a review.
 

The Tribunal emphasised that the onus of proof in establishing his allowable deductions and that he has satisfied any substantiation requirements, as well as establishing that the administrative penalty should not have been made, was on Mr Tyl. Further, Mr Tyl is required to substantiate the whole claim if any expenditure exceeds the reasonable daily allowance allowed by the Commissioner which was $87 per day in the 2012 financial year and $89.60 per day in the 2013 financial year.
 

As noted by the Tribunal member throughout the review, Mr Tyl and his tax agent, Mr Fumberger, failed to provide good, if any, evidence in relation to several material assertions. They failed to present payslips, receipts, adequate bank statements or good evidence of travel allowance. A letter from Mr Tyl’s employer indicated that $50 per overnight trip was recorded on each weekly payslip. This evidence was inconsistent with Mr Tyl’s claim of actual travel expenditure and with his assertion as to the number of nights he spent away for both years, and showed that he exceeded the reasonable daily allowance in both years. He was thus required to substantiate the whole claim for each year with written evidence, which he failed to do.
 

The Tribunal thus affirmed the objection decision and found that the Commissioner was justified in issuing the administrative penalty because Mr Tyl and Mr Fumberger showed a lack of reasonable care.
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 24 January 18

Webb v Deputy Commissioner of Taxation [2017] FCA 1520

In this recent decision of the Federal Court, O’Callaghan J examines a self-represented taxpayers’ application for an extension of time to appeal from the Federal Circuit Court. This decision shows the importance of complying with the appropriate procedures in lodging an appeal and having an application with sufficient merits. With the greatest respect to Mr Webb this case demonstrates the difficulty of representing yourself in the Federal Court.

Following a sequestration order made on 30 May 2017 by the Federal Circuit Court, the taxpayer filed a notice of appeal on 19 September 2017, outside of the 21 day period provided under Rule 36.03 of the Federal Court Rules.

O’Callaghan J in his decision reiterated the well-established principles for allowing an extension of time, which include:

  • whether the applicant has an acceptable explanation for the delay;
  • whether the respondent would suffer prejudice in light of the delay should an extension be granted; and
  • the merits of the substantial application.

In the present case, O’Callaghan J found the taxpayer’s argument that the incorrect form was filed did not demonstrate an acceptable explanation for the delay.

Furthermore, O’Callaghan J found that there was no reasonable prospect of success of the appeal as the contentions outlined in the taxpayer’s affidavit were “self-evidently misconceived”. In the taxpayer’s affidavit, he contended that:

  • the Registrar of the Federal Circuit Court did not have authority to adjudicate the matter;
  • the Deputy Commissioner of Taxation did not have the authority to prosecute the matter;
  • the Registrar had given undue weight to the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 as it has not been lawfully enacted, as it does not have a proclamation certificate prescribed by the Constitution;
  • the Australian Taxation Office was not a legal entity;
  • the Deputy Commissioner of Taxation did not have standing;
  • the Federal Court did not have jurisdiction to proceed without a trial by jury;
  • the “Voice of the Australian Constitution” is relevant.

 

Co-authored with Ben Caratti
 

Posted in: Tax & ATO News Australia at 08 January 18

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Author: David Hughes

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